Mano and Metate

Dublin Core

Title

Mano and Metate

Subject

Artifacts

Description

This photo shows a mano and metate from a site in Orange County in the northern Piedmont. During the Middle Woodland period, people in Virginia began to practice plant cultivation and small-scale agriculture. This was one factor that led them to begin living permanently or semi-permanently in village hamlets, a process called sedentism. By the Late Woodland period, Virginia Indians were agriculturalists who cultivated nuts, grains, beans, and squash. Grains such as corn were ground into flour using a mano held in the hand and a metate as a grinding surface. Archaeologists know that a site’s occupants practiced agriculture and lived in a permanent settlement when they find these types of artifacts, because manos and metates are heavy and wouldn’t have been easily transportable from place to place.

Source

Bill Speiden

Date

500 B.C.E. - 1600 C.E.

Format

.JPG, 1796 × 1196

Type

Image

Coverage

Orange County

Still Image Item Type Metadata

Original Format

Photograph

Physical Dimensions

4 x 6 "

Files

44OR_Speiden_mano_metate.jpg

Citation

“Mano and Metate,” Virginia Indian Archive, accessed December 6, 2021, https://www.virginiaindianarchive.org/items/show/474.

Output Formats