Browse Items (19 total)

  • Tags: food

44MY0003_corn.jpg
Although organic remains rarely survive at archaeological sites, they can sometimes remain in fragile condition if they have been charred. When Virginia Indians cooked food over a hearth, food occasionally fell into the fire and was preserved…

44HR0001_ladles.jpg
These clay ladles or spoons were found at a Late Woodland site in Henry County in the southern Piedmont. Artifacts like these give insight into Virginia Indian daily life in the past. (Photo enhanced)

44HR0003_ladles.jpg
These clay ladles or spoons were found at a Late Woodland site in Henry County in the southern Piedmont. Several are reproductions of those that were too fragile to be transported from the site. (Photo enhanced)

Mattaponi-Encounter-shortened.mp3
In this report by Peter Solomon, Mattaponi chief Carl Custalow explains the process of fertilization and release that has been practiced at the Mattaponi shad hatchery since the 1920s. This is one of five separate features, producedby theVirginia…

44OR_Speiden_mano_metate.jpg
This photo shows a mano and metate from a site in Orange County in the northern Piedmont. During the Middle Woodland period, people in Virginia began to practice plant cultivation and small-scale agriculture. This was one factor that led them to…

44OR_Speiden_nutting_stone_1.jpg
This nutting stone was found at a site in Orange County in the northern Piedmont. The center of the stone was ground out to form a depression that would hold a nut securely while being cracked by another stone from above. Although Virginia Indians…

44OR_Speiden_nutting_stone.jpg
This unusually shaped nutting stone was found at a site in Orange County in the northern Piedmont. The surface of the stone was ground out to form many small depressions, which would hold nuts securely while being cracked by another stone from…

Monacan Harvest.mp3
In this episode of the radio programElder Wisdom with Barbara Roberts, which first aired sometime around 2001, Roberts interviews Monacan tribal members Karenne Wood, Hattie Bell Hamilton, and Lacey Branham on the topic of food and culture. Elder…

What Pocahontas Saw.mp3
Historians Helen Rountree and Camilla Townsend deconstruct and demystify the legend of Pocahontas in this January 14, 2007, radio broadcast of With Good Reason, hosted by Sarah McConnell and produced by the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities.
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