Browse Items tagged "Late Woodland" (137 total)

This two-hole polished stone pendant or gorget was found at a Middle to Late Woodland site in Greensville County in the southern Piedmont. It was ornamental or protective in function, and would have been worn around the neck or throat. (Photo…

Prehistoric Virginia Indians used hammerstones, like these ones found at a site in Orange County in the northern Piedmont, to create stone tools. The rounded sides of a hammerstone were ideal for knocking flakes off of another stone. Archaeologists…

These cache blades were found at a site in Orange County, Virginia. They were partially worked before being cached (stored) together for completion into a more specialized tool when needed. This process allowed a toolmaker to save time when she or…

These grooved axes were collected from a site in Orange County in the northern Piedmont. They are examples of chipped and ground stone technology, the latter of which first appeared during the Late Archaic period but continued through the Early,…

These grooved axes are examples of ground stone technology, which first appeared during the Late Archaic period. This method of tool production involved pecking and grinding the stone down to shape instead of chipping the stone away. Ground stone…

People living on the Southeast coasts often used shark teeth as projectile points or other tools. This tooth, found at an Early to Late Woodland site in Prince George County on the Coastal Plain, is unusual because it belonged to a shark living…

People living on the Southeast coasts often used shark teeth as projectile points or other tools. This tooth, found at an Early to Late Woodland site in Prince George County on the Coastal Plain, is unusual because it belonged to a shark living…